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Back for a third year in Europe A one-day, single track conference, dedicated to JRuby.

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Meet our speakers

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    Image of Charles Nutter

    Charles Nutter

    Red hat Inc.

    Biography

    Charles works on JVM languages at Red Hat, focusing on Ruby but expanding to other languages soon. He has worked on JRuby for the past eight years and has been a JVM enthusiast since Java 1.0. Charles hopes to make JRuby the best Ruby implementation for high performance, big data, and heavy loads, and to use lessons learned from JRuby to help the JVM and other languages that run on it meet their potential.

    “TBA”

    Talk coming soon.

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    Image of Tom Enebo

    Tom Enebo

    Red hat Inc.

    Biography

    Thomas Enebo is co-lead of the JRuby project and an employee of Red Hat. He has been a practitioner of Java since the heady days of the HotJava browser, and he has been happily using Ruby since 2001. Thomas has spoken at numerous Java and Ruby conferences, co-authored "Using JRuby", won the Ruby Hero award, and was awarded the "Rock Star" award at JavaOne. When Thomas is not working he enjoys biking, anime, and drinking a decent IPA.

    “TBA”

    Talk coming soon.

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    Image of Josep M. "Txus" Bach

    Josep M. "Txus" Bach

    Codegram

    Biography

    For the past few years Txus has been studying compilers and virtual machines, as well as developing web-based software professionally. His primary focus of interest is how programming languages and tools enable, shape and constrain the way we think about software. As a case study he is developing a new concurrent programming language that he uses as a playground for all these ideas.

    “Programming the future”

    For the past 50 years the art and craft of programming hasn't changed much. If anything, we have forgotten our history, repeatedly reinventing it poorly.

    The primitive tools we use today hinder us from building the robust software systems of tomorrow, and the new and shiny programming languages which we adopt every few years seem to systematically ignore decades of research in computer science. As programmers, we spend most of our work days fighting complexity by throwing more complexity at it.

    In this talk I'll show and reason about the need to take a step back and try to learn something from the rich (albeit short) history of our craft, which hopefully can give us some ideas as to how can we stop being slaves of our present and start being masters of our future.

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    Image of Mark Menard

    Mark Menard

    Enable Labs

    Biography

    Mark Menard is a Rubyist at Enable Labs, a boutique consulting firm, in Troy, NY, specializing in SaaS and line-of-business productivity applications. Mark has spoken at a number of Ruby conferences. Mark also evangelizes Ruby at such events as BarCamps and CodeCamps. Mark has also spoken on Software Patents at TEDxAlbany, and several academic settings. Mark frequently presents on Ruby issues at the TechValley Ruby Brigade; and does training sessions covering Ruby, Rails, refactoring, test/behavior driven development, and other software development topics.

    Mark used to be a Java developer and caught the dynamic language bug when he started coding in Groovy and then discovered Ruby. Since then he has added iOS development using Objective-C, Ruby's twin separated at birth, and has started dabbling in SmallTalk.

    “Ruby Style”

    JRuby gives us an amazing platform to consume Java libraries and frameworks. The problem is most Java APIs are well... they're Java style. Wouldn't it be nice to wrap up a Java library in a nice Ruby wrapper and consume it like a Rubyist? I'll show some simple techniques I've used to wrap Spring dependency declarations, iText and other Java libraries. We'll also explore replacing XML configuration of Java frameworks with fluent Ruby DSLs.

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    Image of Petr Chalupa

    Petr Chalupa

    Red hat Inc.

    Biography

    Petr Chalupa started to develop in Ruby 8 years ago and has become quite a Ruby enthusiast. He has authored or co-authored gems like: Algebrick, Htmless, Dynflow. He contributed to: Staypuft, Katello, Foreman. Most recently he joined great concurrent-ruby team contributing his actor implementation, since concurrency puzzles and abstractions turned into his latest obsession. He is proudly wearing Red Hat.

    “Concurrent Ruby”

    Ruby is great programming language and we love it, but it has a weak spot - concurrency. I would like to show you:

    • How can this gap be filled with gem called concurrent-ruby.
    • What constructs (including Actor model, Agents, STM) this gem provides.
    • How JRuby wins here.
    • What projects I use it for.

    My hope is that this presentation will give you a good option for surviving your next encounter with concurrency problems.

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    Image of Eric West

    Eric West

    LonelyPlanet

    Biography

    Eric West is a Ruby developer at LonelyPlanet. After being instructed in programming by a Time Travelling robot, Eric began investigating bringing better tools to Ruby. He spent an amazing summer fighting aliens with the JRuby team for GSoC, and working on JRubyParser and Rsense. When he’s not busy in the war against beings from Dimension K, he continues to develop Rsense and other opensource tools.

    “RSense Knows Your Code”

    Rsense brings the kind of static analysis tooling to Ruby that programmers in other languages take for granted. The kind of tooling I kept hearing was impossible to implement for Ruby. Accurate type inference, code completion, definition finding, and eventually so much more. How about a real refactoring tool, or the ability to find whole classes of bugs without executing the code? This is where Rsense is headed.

    Learn how Rsense does its magic, hear the story of how one determined noob brought it back to life, and find out how you can use it to improve your daily coding experience.

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    Image of Ian Smith

    Ian Smith

    Lookout

    Biography

    Ian is a software engineer at Lookout, working on distributed systems and SOAs. In previous lives, he's been a member of MIT's student computing group, SIPB, maintaining mirrors.mit.edu and vote.mit.edu; and a linguist, interested in both theoretical semantics and corpus approaches to linguistic analysis.

    “Building a scalable messaging fabric with JRuby and Storm”

    As Lookout has grown the number of backend Ruby services the need for reliable, asynchronous service-to-service messaging has gone from "nice to have" to "absolute requirement."

    Our first attempts included some names you may be familiar with: ActiveMQ, Resque, Redis, Sidekiq. As our infrastructure grew, we found we were reinventing many of the concepts "Storm," an open source real-time computation/stream-processing system, was specifically designed to handle such as message routing, durability, streaming from multiple inputs, delivering to multiple outputs, etc.

    In this talk we'll cover how we built a scalable service-to-service messaging fabric on top of Storm and Kafka, with JRuby playing a starring role.

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    Image of R. Tyler Croy

    R. Tyler Croy

    Lookout

    Biography

    Over three years ago R. Tyler Croy left Python behind and fell head first into Ruby. With a background in high-performance, event-driven, distributed backend services he was originally frustrated with the state of affairs with the Ruby toolchain. Since finding JRuby however, Tyler has fallen in love. Being able to use the Ruby language and libraries with the JVM's performance and tooling, a near-perfect development environment!

    At Lookout, Inc. Tyler has been using JRuby heavily as the development/deployment environment of choice for the company's nascent business product offerings and for the future of the company's service oriented infrastructure. Utilizing JRuby has allowed Lookout to pick and choose what pieces of JVM-based tooling (e.g. Storm) suit Lookout's size and complexity without sacrificing the development speed or understandability of Ruby.

    Outside of work, Tyler has been a long-time open source contributor; you can find his contributions, under rtyler on GitHub, to the Jenkins, Puppet and FreeBSD communities.

    “Building a scalable messaging fabric with JRuby and Storm”

    As Lookout has grown the number of backend Ruby services the need for reliable, asynchronous service-to-service messaging has gone from "nice to have" to "absolute requirement."

    Our first attempts included some names you may be familiar with: ActiveMQ, Resque, Redis, Sidekiq. As our infrastructure grew, we found we were reinventing many of the concepts "Storm," an open source real-time computation/stream-processing system, was specifically designed to handle such as message routing, durability, streaming from multiple inputs, delivering to multiple outputs, etc.

    In this talk we'll cover how we built a scalable service-to-service messaging fabric on top of Storm and Kafka, with JRuby playing a starring role.

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    Image of Karol Bucek

    Karol Bucek

     

    Biography

    Karol is a truly accidental programmer (except there are no such things as accidents). He started on the Java side until there was nothing left (as he mastered all of the buzz-words recruiters paste into e-mails). Then the story is pretty well known, learned Ruby and realised one can not immitate Rails without using the "right" language. The circle closed as he started deploying and ended up involved with several JRuby projects such as Trinidad, JRuby-Rack, TheRubyRhino and ActiveRecord-JDBC. He is often called "The Janitor", due his obsession to re-invent old APIs (while maintaining back-wards compatibility) when no one's watching.

    “JRuby (on Rails) Knacks”

    We're look at some of the few "little" obstacles that have existed and/or still exist when doing JRuby on Rails. These can easily surprise us especially when running in a truly multi-threaded (production) environment. Should be useful for practicing JRuby-ists as well as "raw" Ruby-ists.

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    Image of Christian Wirth

    Christian Wirth

    Oracle Labs Linz

    Biography

    Christian has a PhD in computer science. He joined Oracle Labs in 2013. While his main focus is on writing a JavaScript engine, he and his team develop the Truffle framework that is also used in JRuby as optional compiler.

    “JRuby’s Truffle Backend”

    JRuby’s new Truffle backend has been in development at Oracle Labs for over a year and is now open source and part of the JRuby 9000 branch. Truffle is a new approach to implementing JVM languages that achieves performance well beyond what is currently possible in JRuby and other similar projects.

    We’ll begin with a high level introduction to what the Truffle backend is and how you can use it, which will be accessible to all. We’ll then explain in more detail exactly how it achieves such high performance compared to all other implementations of Ruby. We’ll finish by outlining where we think Truffle fits into the JRuby ecosystem and introduce some exciting new possibilities in areas such as integration with other languages and debugging.

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The Venue

Berlin impression

Hallo Potsdam! This year's conference will be held at the beautiful campus of Hasso Plattner Institut (S-Bahn Griebnitzsee).

Hasso Plattner Institut, logo

Heimathafen Neukölln, Stage